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These records are from a folder of documents found in the SLC CA25 Memorabilia that belonged to ball-red-02 Deceased John Nathaniel Boland, Lt. Commander. Transcribed for the USS SLC CA25 Website by Don Loe, son of SLC Veteran, Donald Loe

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Long Beach, CA., February 25, 1941

Memorandum for 5th, 6th, & 7th Division Officers:

Subject: AA Fire Control and Optical log; Battery log; Machine gun log

1. In order to keep the number of logs to a minimum it is desired that only one log be used to cover each of the subject items.

2. The Fifth Division Officer will be responsible for the battery log covering all eight 5" guns, the Sixth Division Officer will be responsible for the Fire Control Log covering the AA fire Control installation, the Assistant Optical Officer Deceased (Ens. Farrell B. McFarland) will be responsible for entries concerning AA Optics and the 7th Division JO will be responsible for the Machine Gun Log.

3. Both the 5th and 6th Division Officers will initial all logs indicating that data pertinent to material under their cognizance has been entered. It is the responsibility of these division officers to see that such data is entered.

4. The Batter Log will be divided into the following sub-heads:

Rollers and Roller Paths (Include Roller Path data)
Stands and Carriages
Slides
Guns (Record of running in, bore sighting etc.)
Training Gear
Elevating Gear
Rammers
Breech Mechanism
Recoil and Counter Recoil System
Sub-Caliber Guns
Ammunition Hoists
Ready boxes
Reference Marks and Trams
Stop and Limit Settings
Rounds fired
Foot Firing Mechanisms
Star Guage Data
Loading Machine
Sights
Air Systems
Weekly Log (Include in this remarks of general interest, indicate work done on any sub-head by notation. "See pages __,__,__,__", carried out daily, weekly, monthly routine, etc."
Future Work (Ship's Force, Tender, Navy Yard, Alterations and notation when completed)

Do not record routine cleaning and painting.

In starting this log under each sub-head should be a resume of work done in the Yard.

5. The AA Fire Control and Optical Log will be divided into the following subheads:

Forward AA Director
Range VI
After AA Direct Director
Range VII
Tram Marks
Roller Path Data
Elevation Checks
Train Checks
Elevation Order System
Train Order System
Telescopes
Fuse Transmission System
Battle Order Visual
Salvo Signals
Firing Circuies
Cease Firing Howlers
Motor Generators & Dynamos
Batteries & Instrumental lights
Parallax Units
Weekly Logs
Future Work for NYD & Tender
The weekly log should contain remarks of general interest and a notation by page number of any entry made under the above sub-heads.

In starting this log a brief resume should be made under each sub-head of work done during recent Yard overhaul.

A copy of the AA Fire Control Maintenance Check-off list should be posted in the back of this book.

Entries under Optical Equipment should be made by the AA Optical Officer.

6. All logs will be submitted to the Air Defense Officer on Monday of each week.

Respectfully,
R. A. Chandler

Copy to:
Gunnery Officer
Asst. Gunnery Officer

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CONFIDENTIAL
Pearl Harbor, T.H., June 2, 1941

MEMORANDUM FOR CAPTAIN
Via: Executive Officer


Subject: Training Schedule

Reference:
(a) Comecruscofor ltr. P11-1 (463) of February 25, 1941

(b) Comecruscofor ltr. A5-1/A5-9/ (032) of January 8, 1941

ENCLOSURE:
(A) Legend of Training Exercises

(B) General Gunnery Department Weekly Schedule "At Sea"

(C) General gunnery Department Weekly Schedule "In Port"

1. Enclosures (A), (B), and (C) are submitted as a general outline of the weekly training to be accomplished in the Gunnery Department.

2. In addition to the minimum requirements set forth in the enclosures, the following will be accomplished as required:

(a) Carry out scheduled exercises with special intensive training there for.

(b) Maintain accurate boresighting and alignment of battery

(c) Calibrate rangefinders at every opportunity

3. The minimum requirements will be augmented as practicable. Generally, the minimum requirements easily can be met at sea by holding drills during prescribed exercises. In port, however, the minimum requirements often will be difficult to maintain due to necessary allotment of time to other activities.

Respectfully submitted,
David M. Tyree, Lt. Commander, USN
Gunnery Officer


CONFIDENTIAL - ENCLOSURE "A"

LEGEND

A - Test all fire control circuits and instruments
B - Exercise plotting, tracking, and rangefinder parties
C - Exercise rangefinder crews either on target or with stero-trainer and in making internal adjustments (Comcruscofor letter A5-1/GEN (2702) of August 7, 1940).
D - Exercise officers and enlisted spotters in spotting, and spotting procedure and indoctrination.
E - Exercise plane spotters in spotting procedures in conjunction with ship's spotting drill.
F - Exercise loading crews including ammunition supply crew
G - Exercise gun pointers using local control
H - Exercise sight setting groups
I - Exercise surface fire control parties; pull switches in all battle telephone circuits and use secondary telephones for part of drills.
J - Exercise AA Control, including tracking; pull switches in all battle telephone circuits and use secondary telephones for part of drills.
K - Instruct lookouts in surface and aerial observation
L - Hold casualty drill and instruction
M - Hold instruction in safety precautions
N - Battle Problem. Exercise ship at general quarters and in Condition ZED
O - School for enlisted personnel
P - Instruction of personnel in security measures to protect ships from external damage and internal sabotage.
Q - Drill and instruct Machine Gun Crews
R - Instruct sentries and security personnel in their duties and in small arms safety precautions, and hold familiarization exercise with the weapons with which they are armed.
S - Exercise battery officers, gun and turret captains, at estimating ranges and target angles by eye (Silhouettes)
T - Night General Quarters, with searchlight drill and starshell instruction and control.
U - Inspection
V - Man anti-aircraft battery with watch on board



CONFIDENTIAL - ENCLOSURE "B"

GUNNERY DEPARTMENT WEEKLY SCHEDULE AT SEA


DAY FORENOON AFTERNOON EVENING
Monday A B D F G H J C D K E N/A
Tuesday A B D I Q C D O P T
Wednesday A B D F G H J C D L M S N/A
Thursday A B D I N C D E K R C
Friday A B C D U N/A
Saturday U N/A N/A


The above schedule gives minimum requirements for training. It will be augmented as practicable.


CONFIDENTIAL - ENCLOSURE "C"

GUNNERY DEPARTMENT WEEKLY SCHEDULE IN PORT


DAY FORENOON
0930-1100
AFTERNOON
1300-1430
EVENING
1615-1645
Monday A C D F H J Q C D R V
Tuesday A C D G I J D K O V
Wednesday A C D F H J L M N/A N/A
Thursday A C D G I J N D K S N/A
Friday A J U N/A
Saturday U N/A N/A


The above schedule gives minimum requirements for training during normal conditions in port. During tender overhauls, provisioning periods, etc. it will be adjusted as necessary.

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PROCEDURE TO REPEL AIR ATTACK

CA25/A5-1/Gen.    USS SALT LAKE CITY ---90-1p - No Date

1. Pass word over All loud speaker circuits:     "AIR RAID --- AIR RAID ---AIR RAID"

Then sound general quarters on the bugle, and then sound the general alarm.

2. A.A. Gun and AA Control Personnel already on watch remain at AA stations until relieved by Condition I AA Crews during first lull in the firing - if firing has commenced.

3. Condition I AA Crews proceed to battle stations. If firing has commenced, wait for lull before relieving, taking advantage of nearby cover. Do not interrupt fire of gun when relieving.

4. Other personnel use routes below decks as far as possible in proceeding to battle stations.

5. Repair and Turret Personnel give priority to setting Condition Zed. Do not dangerously expose personnel to close weather deck hatches, ports, etc., but close and secure same during lull in attack.

6. Commence sending up replacement AA ammunition immediately (without orders from Sky Control).

7. Turrets do not bring up powder from magazines unless ordered to do so.

8. Personnel having exposed battle stations always have adequate clothing close at hand which they can put on immediately to protect themselves against flash burns.

9. ALL exposed personnel wear trench helmets, and use cotton in ears if near any gun

SUBMITTED:
/s/ David M. Tyree, Lt. Commander, USN
Gunnery Officer

Approved:
E. M. ZACHARIAS, Captain, USN
Commanding Officer ball-red-02 Deceased


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December 9, 1941

MEMORANDUM FOR SKY CONTROL, GROUP CONTROL AND BATTERY OFFICERS:

Subject: Minimum Required Condition of Alertness in Anti-Aircraft Battery


1. All manned 5" AA Guns in Condition II and III should have a minimum of three men always alert and at their stations ready instantaneously to carry out these three functions:

(a) Ram the first shell home
(b) Train the gun
(c) Point and fire the gun

2. It is the responsibility of every officer having a Condition Watch with the A.A. Battery to insure the compliance of this necessity.

/s/ James T. Brewer, Lieutenant, USNR
Air Defense Officer ball-red-02 Deceased

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December 9, 1941

MEMORANDUM FOR SKY CONTROL, GROUP CONTROL AND BATTERY OFFICERS:

Subject: Dissemination of Information

1. It is essential that key officers and men of the AA Battery including the Condition Watch Officers keep each other advised of all the information available concerning planes, surface craft, dispositions, friends, enemy, etc.

2. Remember both ends in the chain of command. Those below you and those above. Keep the information flowing freely in both directions. Don't let important information stop and expire at your station.

/s/ James T. Brewer, Lieutenant, USNR Deceased
Air Defense Officer


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December 10, 1941

GUNNERY DEPARTMENT NOTES


1. Gunnery Department Notes will be issued frequently. Anyone having a suggestion or making an observation that should be brought to the attention of all hands, should inform Gunnery Officer immediately. Division officers and Battery Officers publish these notes to all men.

2. Use 10 degrees elevation in surface ready position instead of 5 degrees. During a heavy roll cartridge sometimes slides into bore of gun if elevated only 5 degrees.

3. Personnel not stationed as gun captain or rammer man on 5" guns do not tamper with spades and rammer when guns are in stand-by condition.

4. Use care in handling ammunition. Observe safety precautions.

5. Keep 5" ammunition protected from direct rays of sun. Keep it dry. Keep firing circuits dry.

6. Material must be kept in good operating condition.

/s/ David M. Tyree, Lt. Commander, USN
Gunnery Officer

DISTRIBUTION:
All Officers
Gun. Dept.
Bull. Board


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December 10, 1941

MEMORANDUM FOR SKY CONTROL, GROUP CONTROL AND BATTERY OFFICERS:

Subject: Searchlights at night - Comments on

1. Searchlights will NOT be used against Torpedo Planes at night, chiefly, for the following reasons:

(a) Difficulty and delay in getting on the target before shutters are opened.
(b) Reveals our position to other enemy planes or ships
(c) Searchlights directed against torpedo planes coming in would blind own machine gunners
(d) May reveal other of our own ships in the beam.

/s/ David M. Tyree, Lt. Commander, USN
Gunnery Officer


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December 11, 1941

MEMORANDUM FOR SKY CONTROL, GROUP CONTROL AND BATTERY OFFICERS

SUBJECT: Current 5" Battery Condition III Notes


1. Rammers will be tested each watch.

2. When guns are in surface ready position in expectancy of sighting submarines, sights will be set at zero range and 500 deflection.

/s/ James T. Brewer, Lieutenant, USNR Deceased
Air Defense Officer

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December 11, 1941

G-U-N-N-E-R-Y    D-E-P-A-R-T-M-E-N-T    N-O-T-E-S

1. The smoking lamp is out on the communication deck and after superstructure deck at all times.

2. Have small canvas covers made to throw over breech of 5" Guns during rain squalls and sea spray. Be particularly careful not to inadvertently catch rammer lever and thus load cartridge.

3. Do not be confused by the red band on service projectiles. it merely indicates that the projectile contains a red tracer.

4. Helmets, except marine helmets, are issued to stations and not to individual men. when relieved at gun or control stations, turn helmet over to your relief.

5. Until further orders, do not use friendly planes for tracking drill.

6. Only one warning 5" shot should be fired in direction of submarine periscope. The object is to warn other ships in vicinity that a submarine is present and to point out its approximate location in order that the destroyers may attack it and the larger ships maneuver to avoid it. If the periscope is close aboard machine gun fire may be effective and an actual hit on it obtained. To maintain 5" fire will only delay action by destroyers and planes who would be forced to keep clear of our own gun fire. In firing this warning shot, do it promptly, but coolly and deliberately. Do not become excited. Observe safely precautions. DO NOT FIRE IN DIRECTION OF OWN SHIPS OR PLANES. A few seconds used in firing this one shot with precision will prevent the probability of casualty. Remember, only one shot - not to be fired if friendly ships or planes are in way - fired with absolute deliberation. Relax!

7. On the other hand, if we should catch a submarine on the surface or coming to the surface, the group control officer should open fire with entire battery (except guns that would endanger our planes on board). Use director fire if possible, but if close aboard, use pointer fire.

8. For surface fire, gun captains insure that fuses are set on safety.

9. When gun fire is heard, and no call is sounded, do not rush topside. If you have nothing to do, proceed quietly to your battle station or its vicinity and await further orders. If a call is sounded, proceed on double to your station and stay there. Do not attempt to do someone else's job until you are ordered to so. Strict discipline must be enforced. Officers and petty officers see that is The men will cooperate willingly.

10. This is our war and we are just beginning to fight. Keep calm and relax! But keep ALERT.

/s/ David M. Tyree, Lt. Commander, USN
Gunnery Officer
Copy to:
All officers: Gun Dept


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December 12, 1941

MEMORANDUM FOR CONTROL OFFICERS, SKY CONTROL OFFICERS, BATTERY OFFICERS, BATTERY CAPTAINS, 5" GUNNERS MATES, GUN CAPTAINS AND GUNNER

SUBJECT: AMMUNITION - Care in Handling

1. Do not become careless while handling ammunition. Observe safety precautions.

2. Remember also that shells dent easily and become unfit for use.

3. Careless handling of ammunition has already caused more than one cartridge on the ship to be set aside as useless.

4. Handle 5" ammunition gently and with great respect when taking it out of or putting it into tanks and give it the same attention when required to handle it around the gun.

/s/ James T. Brewer, Lieutenant, USNR Deceased
Assistant Gunnery Officer


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December 14, 1941

G-U-N-N-E-R-Y    D-E-P-A-R-T-M-E-N-T    N-O-T-E-S

1. Whenever practicable during daylight, hold instruction for Condition III crews on watch in procedure for various types of fire such as:

(a) Defense against dive bombing
(b) Defense against torpedo planes
(c) Star shell spreads, etc.

Our Condition III crews soon should become thoroughly indoctrinated in the procedure for any situation that might arise. DO NOT NEGLECT YOUR OPPORTUNITIES FOR LEARNING. Ask questions.

2. Be sure that gun crews know the distribution of ammunition in the ready boxes.

3. Remove searchlight covers during evening general quarters and replace them during dawn general quarters.

4. Turing on searchlights or opening fire at night will be done ONLY when ordered by Captain or Supervisor of Watch (Head of Department Bridge Watch).

5. Condition III is designed to give security against surprise and at the same time to give men and officers sufficient rest so that they will be mentally and physically ready for any emergency. Except for a few men such as ship's cooks, etc., who furnish certain essential services, and engineers, where watches depend on boiler power requirements, every man on the ship has a watch in four in Condition III. Also opportunity is afforded during day time for some rest. Therefore it is considered that ALL men on watch should remain awake and alert whenever on watch in order to be ready for instant action and to guard against surprise. Lookouts at guns should be rotated frequently in order to keep fresh pairs of eyes always on watch. There is no objection to men sitting down and protecting themselves from the weather when it is not their turn to keep the look-out, but they should not permit themselves to fall asleep.

6. It has been noticed that men sleeping in the crew's recreation compartment are blocking traffic through this compartment. A passageway must be left on each side of the compartment, and a passageway from each side to the center ladder.

7. In order to relieve congestion, when going to battle stations, men in turret crews who are below decks when general quarters is sounded, should enter turrets through shell decks as far as practicable.

8. It has been suggested that sufficient battle lights to light passageways below decks be kept turned on during day time to provide against confusion that would be caused by sudden failure of lighting circuit.

9. LOOKOUTS - Do not permit yourselves to be distracted by what goes on outside of your own sector. Stick to your job. Do not neglect sectors abaft the beam. Danger can approach the ship from the quarter as well as the bow.

10. It is desired to accomplish the following at drill Monday, 15 December. (a) Loading and ammunition supply drill for turrets I and II and IV. Complete loading drill by 1400.

(b) Casualty instruction for turrets I and III
(c) Inter-director drill for rangekeeper operators and director pointers
(d) Spotting Drill
(e) Rangefinder drill if targets are available
(f) Instruction of 5" gun crews in various types of antiaircraft defense
(g) Loading drill for 5" crews from 1400 to 1500.

NOTE:

(1) During this period, turrets I and III will not hold any drill which would interfere with these turrets being promptly ready for action.

(2) Only two 5" loading crews will be at loading machine, and thus absent from gun stations, at any one time.

Respectfully,
/s/ David M. Tyree, Lt. Commander, USN
Gunnery Officer


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December 14, 1941

PLAN OF THE DAY - DAILY ROUTINE - FRIDAY:


0530 Reveille - up all hammocks - serve coffee
0600 Mess Gear
1130 Mess Gear
1200 Relieve the watch
1600 Mess Gear
1630 Relieve the watch
1700 Close all battle ports
1715 (or at sunset) Darken Ship

WORKING DIVISION: THIRD DIVISION
DUTY SECTION: FORTH SECTION

NOTES:

Edward E. Dolecek, Commander, USN, Executive Officer

From: Commander Cruisers, Scouting Force
To: Cruisers, Scouting Force
Subject: Remember Pearl Harbor

1. Today I saw the destruction wrought upon the Navy in Pearl Harbor by the Japanese on December 7, 1941. The sight was not a pleasant one. It was a sight that must arouse the just wrath of every American. Turrets of stricken battleships, trained for and aft, gave mute testimony of the stealthy swiftness with which the yellow serpents struck. They struck while their government's representatives were being received in good faith by our President. They struck in accordance with a diabolical plan conceived in crafty minds, treacherous and cunning beyond our conception. In the planning and execution of the dastardly attack they were aided, undoubtedly, by their no-less diabolical Nazi allies and, certainly, by the incomparably low form of animal life, the fifth columnist.

2. This heinous crime against the Navy and the Marine Corps, our country, and the decency and integrity of the civilized world, must be avenged. I assign this task to these heavy cruisers. Let every officer and man be on the alert to detect the enemy's stealthy approach in the air, on the water and beneath the seas. Let every officer and man work to the utmost of his ability to the end that whenever the enemy is brought to battle he will be sunk swiftly and surely.

3. Let "Remember Pearl Harbor" be our battle cry!

DISTRICT MEMORANDUM:
Subject: Evacuation of Navy Personnel

1. Dependents of Navy Personnel desiring evacuation to mainland should register as soon as practicable with District Overseas Transportation Office, Pearl harbor or with the Office of Captain M. M. Frucht, USN (retired), in the Castle and Cooke Building, Honolulu, T.H.

The following named men report to Sick Bay at 0800 this date:

R. F. Rickey, CMM
Robert A. Seaton, AM1c ball-red-02
J. R. Hancock, Sgt.
Arthur M. Marcy, GM3c
L. B. Nelson, MM1c ball-red-02 Deceased
I. M. Puryear, AMM3c Deceased
G. F. Payne, S1c
Samuel P. Kelley, Bkr1c
McElwain, R. J., GM2c ball-red-02 Deceased
T. Nesbitt, BM2c
R. W. Weichman
E. J. Czarnowski, WT1c
Darwin D. Menz, FC2c
Bernard E. Godde, Bkr2c ball-red-02
W. W. Scott, S1c
Woodrow W. Red, FC1c
Larry C. Metzler, CFC ball-red-02 Deceased

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December 26, 1941

MEMORANDUM FOR: SKY CONTROL OFFICERS, GROUP CONTROL OFFICERS, BATTERY OFFICERS, BATTERY CAPTAINS AND GUN CAPTAINS

Subject: Safety Precautions


1. Don't leave a charge in a hot gun
2. Unload a charge in a hot gun through the muzzle

Respectfully,
/s/ James T. Brewer, Lieutenant, USNR ball-red-02 Deceased
Air Defense Officer

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December 26, 1941

MEMORANDUM FOR: SKY CONTROL OFFICERS, GROUP CONTROL OFFICERS, BATTERY OFFICERS AND GUN CAPTAINS

Subject: Seating projectile in the fuse pots - 5"/25 caliber guns


1. VERY IMPORTANT - When putting projectile in fuse pot, be sure to spin it until it seats itself in the fuse pot.

2. Make certain that fuse pot loaders on all regular and Condition Watch Crews understand how to do this and why they must do it.

3. Make sure also that relief fuse pot loaders understand.

4. Improper seating of projectile in fuse pot prevents fuse from being set as computed and renders fire ineffective against enemy.

Respectfully,
/s/ James T. Brewer, Lieutenant, USNR ball-red-02 Deceased
Air Defense Officer

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January 13, 1942

MEMORANDUM FOR: SKY CONTROL CREWS, GUN CREWS, CONTROL OFFICERS, BATTERY OFFICERS, MACHINE GUN CREWS AND LOOKOUTS.

Subject: Telephone Talkers

1. It has been noticed that telephone talkers, particularly those on the guns, are too apt to consider themselves unnecessary. No man on a gun station is more important. There is no use in having loaded guns manned at all times if the men in these guns cannot "get the dope" quickly, what to aim at and when to shoot. As Admiral Nelson said of Naval Warfare "Time is everything". By the time a gun talker and a control officer get thru giving each other "repeat", the ship may be sinking. To the end that this not happen to us the following notes are forwarded herewith.

2. In the first place, MANNER OF SELECTING TALKERS, Battery and Control officers will insure that certain men are NEVER detailed as telephone talkers. These men fall into two classes - the "incurable drawlers" and the rough-voiced "whiskey basses". No amount of instruction could ever make talkers of them, they haven't voices which can be understood easily on a phone. Having selected the talker, that talker must know what stations are on his line, what reports are required of him, and the manner on making the reports.

3. In the second place, MANNER OF SAFEGUARDING MATERIAL. Foremost, STAY OFF THE BUTTONS. They are not playthings. Fire Controlmen spend about 3 hours daily repairing phones, much of WHICH would be necessary if the Marconi Artists would do their radio practicing off the circuits. Besides being a nuisance to everyone on the line and menace to efficient communications it indicates a moronic streak in the man concerned. It is entirely within the power of control officers to use the fire control switchboard to locate offenders. Next, KEEP YOUR LEADS CLEAR OF MOVING PARTS OF THE GUNS. A few nites ago a 5" inch gun cut its lead in the training gear while trained on an unidentified destroyer less than 1,000 yards distant. This mistake could have been fatal. If you hear crackling noises continually on your circuit, CHECK YOUR LEAD. Insure that it is tightly screwed into the jackbox. Jiggle the leads to your headphones. If it appears to be your phone, get a new one. If there is no spare on the station, get control officer's permission to send a man to fire control workshop for a new pair. In any case send defective set to the fire control workshop IMMEDIATELY.

4. In the third place, manner of talking. PRESS THE BUTTON DOWN ALL THE WAY AND HOLD IT SO. PHONE MUST BE VERTICAL, YOU CAN'T BE HEARD OVER A PHONE LYING DOWN. KEEP THE MOUTH ABOUT 2 INCHES FROM THE MOUTHPIECE. TALK LOUDLY, ENUNCIATE CLEARLY - DON'T BE BASHFUL. KNOW WHAT YOU WILL SAY BEFORE YOU PRESS YOUR BUTTON, THEN SAY IT AND LIFT YOUR BUTTON AGAIN. DON'T STAMMER AND THINK ON THE LINE AND REMEMBER THAT YOU CAN'T HEAR THE OTHER MAN WITH YOUR BUTTON DOWN.

5. In the forth place, MANNER OF REPORTING. Phone language is necessarily brief. At a busy time many people must say much in a short time on each circuit. There is not time for "reports" or for unnecessary words.

FIRST - the station you are calling - as "Sky Forward".

SECOND, who are you - the station addressed wants to know - "Gun 5".

THIRD, what do you want to report? - "Two planes", "Red light", "Surface ship".

FORTH, where? For surface objects give bearing and distance - "Bearing 135, range 8000 yards". For aircraft bearing and position angle - "Bearing 135, position angle 15 degrees". THEN if you have additional information give it. Control officer can look and listen at same time. For example " Appears to be a 4 stack destroyer", "Looks like a Drummond Fighter" Leave out the unnecessaries. If you want the recognition signals request them like so: "Sky Forward, Gun 5. What are the recognition signals?" Contrast with "Sky Forward, this is Gun 5. COULD YOU PLEASE GIVE ME THE NEW recognition signals?" If you want a repeat - "Sky Forward, Gun 5 repeat". Contrast with "Repeat that last word". No one knows in this case who is addressed or what gun is having trouble, and "that last word" is unnecessary. Above all STAY ON YOUR TOES. Don't be the one to ask for repeats when someone is shooting at you and you should be shooting at someone. Listen to yourself on your own earphones when you talk. You can hear yourself as well as anyone on the line. Are you clear? Are you brief? Are your reports complete? Are you saying to much?

6. UNNECESSARY CONVERSATION OF A PERSONAL NATURE WILL NEVER BE TOLERATED OVER FIRE CONTROL CIRCUITS.

7. Battery and control officers will insure that all men on their stations are acquainted with the contents of this, and have read, practiced and thoroughly understand it.

Respectfully,
/s/ James T. Brewer, Lieutenant, USNR ball-red-02 Deceased
Air Defense Officer


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January 14, 1942

MEMORANDUM: SKY CONTROL OFFICERS, GROUP CONTROL OFFICERS, BATTERY OFFICERS, BATTERY CAPTAINS AND GUN CAPTAINS

Subject: Maintenance of 5" Battery in Fighting Condition

1. The Gunner will make a daily inspection of the 5" Battery with view to maintaining it in a condition to function perfectly when called upon to shoot.

2. The Gunner is authorized to deal directly with the Gunner's Mates giving them orders and instructions in matters of immediate urgency in accordance with Gunnery Department Order NO. 1-42.

3. The forenoon watch, 0800-1200, will be used to clean up gun stations. The Condition III crews at the guns during this watch will, each day, join in the general cleaning up. They will be expected to turn to on all jobs incident to cleaning up the station and the guns except scrubbing the gun shields. This latter function will be performed by the division concerned, as always. Battery Officers will initiate and supervise the operations on the forenoon watch.

4. The last half hour of each and every watch will be used by Condition II and III crews to police and tidy up their stations, before the oncoming watch arrives. This action will be initiated and supervised by the Battery officer.

5. Maintenance of the Guns is to be performed by the Gunner's Mates assigned, preferably during the daytime watches in which their own section is on watch. If necessary, they may make use of Condition Crews to help them providing, in doing so, that the alertness of the Battery is not decreased. Battery Officers in all condition watches are to keep familiar with work being done on the guns and its progress. They are to possess copies of the Gunner's Mates' check off lists to use as basis of work requ ired and general familiarization.

6. A Battery Officer's check off list of items to be checked off each watch to insure the immediate readiness of the battery is being prepared and will be put into use as soon as circulated.

7. Canvas gun covers are not to be stored on top of the ready boxes.

8. Frequent drills are to be held in which the gun crews open ready boxes, secure the flaps back and start to take out either AA Common or Star Shells as ordered. USE CARE IN HANDING AMMUNITION.

9. Battery Officers will maintain gun crew cards for both condition II and III and keep the crews stabilized.

/s/ James T. Brewer, Lieutenant, USNR ball-red-02 Deceased
Assistant Gunnery Officer

Copy to:
Gunnery Officer
Gunner


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January 14, 1942

GUNNERY DEPARTMENT ORDER NO. 1-42

Subject: Material Upkeep of Ordnance Equipment

1. The Ship's Gunner is designated as Material Officer, operating under the Gunnery Officer through the Air Defense Officer for the Antiaircraft Battery and Main Battery Assistant for the Main Battery. He will not stand Condition Watches.

2. The Gunner shall give orders and instructions directly to the turret captains and gunner's mates when he considers immediate action is necessary. He should keep Division Officers and Battery officers informed of such orders and instructions. Division and Battery officers should bring to the attention of the Air Defense Officer or Main Battery Assistant any instance in which they disagree with the Gunner concerning matters of material upkeep. When practicable the Gunner should advise the division or battery officers as to work required rather than issue orders directly to the petty officers, in order that the necessary orders and instructions may be issued in the normal manner.

3. This order does not relieve the Division Officers of responsibility for upkeep of material under their cognizance.

4. The intent of this order is to provide one officer experienced in technical matters who can devote his entire attention to matters pertaining to material. Responsible officers should use his services and advice in such matters to the fullest extent.

/s/ David M. Tyree, Lt. Commander, USN
Gunnery Officer


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January 19, 1942

MEMORANDUM FOR: SKY CONTROL OFFICERS, GROUP CONTROL OFFICERS, BATTERY CONTROL OFFICERS AND BATTERY CAPTAINS

Subject: Miscellaneous Pertinent Instructions and Information

1. READING ON WATCH AT GUN STATIONS:

The following men may NEVER read:

(a) Shield lookouts
(b) Sight setter - telephone talker
(c) Any man right on a gun
This means that no one is to drape himself on a gun seat or platform to relax and read.
(d) Crews called to ALERT

The following men may read:

(a) Members of gun crews other than those above providing they stay clear of the lookouts and clear of the gun itself. They must stay near the gun but, at the same time clear of it.

2. BINOCULARS FOR REDUCED VISIBILITY LOOKOUTS

Previous binocular distributions are cancelled. The following are in effect:

SHIELD LOOKOUTS - GUNS 1 to 8 inclusive - Supplied with 8 - 6x30 binoculars

BRIDGE WING LOOKOUTS and FANTAIL LOOKOUTS - Supplied with 4 - 7x50 binoculars

MACHINE GUN PLATFORM LOOKOUTS - Search with the naked eye

3. NOTE FOR 1v1 GUNS

NEVER fire a 1v1 gun through the muzzle bag while it is loaded, as at present, entirely with fused projectiles.

Respectfully,
/s/ James T. Brewer, Lieutenant, USNR ball-red-02 Deceased
Air Defense Officer

Copy to:
Gunnery Officer
Gunner


US FLAGBAR

January 19, 1942

MEMORANDUM FOR BATTERY OFFICERS, BATTERY CAPTAINS AND GUN CAPTAINS

Subject: Battery Officers Check Off List

1. The following check off list was submitted by a battery officer

2. It is submitted for your information and compliance

"Upon relieving each watch and at general quarters GUN CAPTAINS will personally check over their gun to assure themselves that the gun is in readiness to fire in all respects. The following should be observed:

1. Check to see that air supply is cut into the gun and that air pressure is normal (1800 lbs.). Test rammers.

2. Check the sight set-up on the gun. Rotate both the elevating sight handle and deflection scale to determine whether or not they operate freely and are set CORRECTLY.

3. Check Fuse setting

4. Make sure safety link is removed from the slide.

5. Be sure that the gloves for the hot shell man and first loader are passed on to your gun crew.

6. Be sure that there is no loose gear on the gun or in the gun shield. Keep gun and gun deck cleaned up at all times. One-half hour before being relieved police your gun deck so that you can turn over to the gun captain who relieves you a clean and orderly gun, deck and shield.

7. Gun Captains be sure to report any and all discrepancies noted, to the Battery officer or Gunner's Mate.

8. Remember Gun Captains you are responsible for your gun and your gun crew. A responsibility which must not be neglected."
Respectfully,
/s/ James T. Brewer, Lieutenant, USNR ball-red-02 Deceased
Air Defense Officer

Copy to:
Gunnery Officer
Gunner

US FLAGBAR

January 19, 1942

MEMORANDUM FOR BATTERY OFFICERS, BATTERY CAPTAINS AND GUN CAPTAINS

Subject: Battery Officers Check Off List

1. The following check off list was submitted by a battery officer

2. It is submitted for your information and compliance

"Upon relieving each watch and at general quarters GUN CAPTAINS will personally check over their gun to assure themselves that the gun is in readiness to fire in all respects. The following should be observed:

1. Check to see that air supply is cut into the gun and that air pressure is normal (1800 lbs.). Test rammers.

2. Check the sight set-up on the gun. Rotate both the elevating sight handle and deflection scale to determine whether or not they operate freely and are set CORRECTLY.

3. Check Fuse setting

4. Make sure safety link is removed from the slide.

5. Be sure that the gloves for the hot shell man and first loader are passed on to your gun crew.

6. Be sure that there is no loose gear on the gun or in the gun shield. Keep gun and gun deck cleaned up at all times. One-half hour before being relieved police your gun deck so that you can turn over to the gun captain who relieves you a clean and orderly gun, deck and shield.

7. Gun Captains be sure to report any and all discrepancies noted, to the Battery officer or Gunner's Mate.

8. Remember Gun Captains you are responsible for your gun and your gun crew. A responsibility which must not be neglected."
Respectfully,
/s/ James T. Brewer, Lieutenant, USNR ball-red-02 Deceased
Air Defense Officer

Copy to:
Gunnery Officer
Gunner

US FLAGBAR

January 23, 1942

MEMORANDUM FOR: ALL DIVISION OFFICERS, SKY CONTROL OFFICERS, GROUP CONTROL OFFICERS, BATTERY OFFICERS

Subject: Necessary Services - Excused from Condition II and III Watches.

1. In order that special calls for men to be excused from Condition Watches be eliminated and to stabilize the Condition Watch Crews the following definite assignments to definite necessary services in ship keeping have been assigned. These jobs are all to be excused from Condition II and III.

2. It is to be noted, with the following assignments in effect, that MESS COOKS ARE REQUIRED TO STAND CONDITION WATCHES with their sections and ARE REQUIRED TO ATTEND GUNNERY DRILLS.

3.ASSIGNMENTS (Placed in effect 1/21/42).



JOB NAME RATE DIVISION SECTION
Master At Arms MCCALL, C. E. ball-red-02 Deceased CMM ENG. 4
HANGER, Max CWT ENG. 1
BOONE, J. F. BM1c 5th 2
CZAJKOWSKI, W. E. COX 5th 3
MAXWELL, F. J. COX 2nd 4
LAUNDRY HOLMAN, R. B. CGM 5th 4
STEWART, J. H. SEA1c 6th 3
HOLMES, R. O. Deceased SEA1c 3rd 1
WYCKOFF, G. M. SEA1c 3rd 3
TOTI, P. SEA1c "F" 2
COX, C. N. PVT. 7th 4
TENNYSON, J. Deceased F2c ENG. 3
SCULLERY EIGHT MEN DETAILED FROM ENGINEERS
VEGETABLE PEELERS EKNESS, W. D. SEA2c 1st 1
ROBERTS, Unknown SEA2c 2nd 2
COGBURN, J. D. SEA2c 3rd 3
TODD, R. J. Deceased SEA2c 4th 4
GALLEY, BAKE, BUTCHER, ISSUING ROOM TWENTY MEN DETAILED FROM "S" DIV.
CAPTAIN'S WARDROOM
WARRANT OFF's MESS
EIGHTEEN MEN DETAILED FROM "S" DIV.
CPO MESS COOKS MAXWELL, G. L. ball-red-02 Deceased SEA2c 2nd 1
DUNHAM, H. O. ball-red-02 Deceased SEA2c 4th 2
HADSELFORD, H. O. SEA2c 6th 3
MESS HALL SUPERVISOR BOYER, M. L. BM1c 3rd 1
MAIN DECK HEAD ROCCOFORTE, V. Deceased SEA2c 5th 3
MAIN DECK WASHROOM BROOKS, Unknown SEA1c 6th 4
RECREATION ROOM DRUMMOND, H. SEA2c 5th 2
LOE, D. G. ball-red-02 SEA2c 6th 1
MESS HALL HOLM, J. E. ball-red-02 Deceased SEA2c 1st 3
CAMPBELL, Unknown SEA2c 2nd 3
FORTENBERRY, G. N. SEA1c 3rd 1
SHARPE, Unknown SEA2c 4th 2
ZUCATI, L. R. Deceased SEA2c 5th 4
EVANS, Unknown AS 6th 2
SHIPS SERVICE STORE SIMON, G. L. PFC. 7th 4
VISCONTI, A. A. ENG. ENG. 1
CAPTAINS ORDERLIES FOUR MEN (2 men in Condition II) from 7th DIV.
CAPTAINS & EXEC. OFFICERS YEO. TWO MEN FROM CY DIV.
CHIEF STOREKEEPER ONE MAN FROM "S" DIV.
CHIEF QUARTERMASTER ONE MAN FROM "N" DIV.

Respectfully,

/s/ James T. Brewer, Lieutenant, USNR ball-red-02 Deceased
Assistant Gunnery Officer

Copy to:
Executive Officer
Navigator, Gunnery Officer
Communications Officer, Chief Engineer
Supply Officer
Gunner
Chief M.A.A.

US FLAGBAR

January 27, 1942

MEMORANDUM FOR: ALL 5" BATTERY OFFICERS AND BATTERY CAPTAINS

INFORMATION: SKY CONTROL, GROUP CONTROL OFFICERS

Subject: Battery Officers Check off lists.

1. The following items which summarize your recurrent duties are forwarded to serve you as a check off list while standing watch.

(1) Status of all guns, ready boxes and hoists
(2) Post and inspect lookouts on gun shields. (Also inspect Fantail and Foretop twice a watch.)
(3) Check 1v1 crews. (Twice a watch)
(4) Supervise the check off list for 5 inch when Gunner's Mates are checking off the battery.
(5) Check temperatures of ready boxes hourly.
(6) Have two guns pointed and trained into the sun at all times.
(7) Keep tops of ready boxes clear of gun covers, life jackets and all other gear.
(8) Check up on forward and After Battery Phones, seeing that they are competently manned, and that the phone leads are kept clear of the top and bottom of ladders where traffic is heavy.
(9) See that Guns 1, 2, 7, and 8 are fully manned.
(10) See that tank wrenches, hand wrenched and re-cocking tools are available on forward and after battery.
(11) Check up to see if any new methods have been put into effect since your last watch.
(12) On forward battery, keep men from setting or lounging at top of ladder going into Officer's Country and bottom of ladder going to the bridge.
(13) Make sure all ready boxes can be easily opened and that crews know how to secure the lids properly.
(14) Men wearing Battery Officer's phones must stay in the vicinity of the guns.
Respectfully,
/s/ James T. Brewer, Lieutenant, USNR ball-red-02 Deceased
Air Defense Officer

Copy to:
Gunnery Officer
Gunner
Supervisor of Watch
Note Book
O.O.D.'s Note Book

US FLAGBAR

January 27, 1942

Memorandum For ALL 5" GUN CAPTAINS (REGULAR GENERAL QUARTERS CAPTAINS, CONDITION II, CONDITION III AND EMERGENCY CAPTAINS, INCLUDING "V" DIVISION).

INFORMATION: ALL SKY CONTROL, GROUP CONTROL AND BATTERY OFFICERS AND BATTERY CAPTAINS.

Subject: Gun Captains Duties


1. The following list of duties is submitted as a guide for the minimum requirements of a Gun Captain on the 5" Battery:

G-U-N    C-A-P-T-A-I-N-S    D-U-T-I-E-S

(1) Post 2 lookouts on each gun shield - assigning the proper sectors, Lookouts will stand short watches, evenly divided among members of the gun crew. A gun having an abbreviated crew will draw help from the full gun crew of the adjacent gun, for lookout purposes, so that there will always be two lookouts on each shield. Lookouts will not talk to each other while on watch.

(2) Check up on your binoculars and see if they are in satisfactory condition. (When it rains, be sure binoculars are properly taken care of)..Each gun has a pair of 6 x 30 binoculars.

(3) See that flash proof clothing or dungarees with long trousers and long sleeves is worn by all members of your gun crew. (If dungarees are worn, flash proof clothing must be carried to Gun Station and kept handy.)

(4) See that life jackets are carried or worn by all members of gun crew at general quarters and dill call.

(5) Require each member of your gun crew to wear a tin hat at general quarters and while exercising at drill call.

(6) After it has rained, there is often a considerable amount of water in the stand - remove the water by sweeping with a broom, as it seeps down into the working parts if not removed.

(7) In hot sun, have the projectiles in fuze pot and tray covered up.

(8) See that helmets are properly secured and not lying about the deck.

(9) See that all mess gear is taken below on the 0600 to 0800 watch. Salt Lake City #12 page two of three

(10) See that each member of gun crew has a wad of cotton his person. (Should be kept in pocket of jumper)

(11) Discourage anyone going below but, if a urgent request needs to be granted, allow only one MAN to go below at a time, and then have him report to you when he leaves and when he returns.

(12) Reading is not permitted on gun shields or on gun. Reading is allowed under the canvas cover.

(13) Keep all life jackets, blankets, clothes and magazines off the gun and the gun shield itself.

(14) When putting on gun covers, insure that the pointer's key is open and the switch is on Motor Generator. Leave air valve at each gun open at all times. Never shut the air off by the valve at your gun. Be careful not to accidentally ram the shell home.

(15) Make sure that your sight-setter knows how to talk over the phones. It is imperative that an alert and intelligent talker be used.

(16) Make sure that each member of gun crew knows where his gun's ready boxes are located. Loaders must know how to open ready box lids and pin them back, thus securing the lids for firing.

(17) Whenever you get an order to take the projectile from the tray and stow it in ready box make sure, yourself, that the fuse is set on safety.

(18) Know where your sound power phones are stowed and also where they are plugged in at the gun. Always plug them in at general quarters and at drill and be prepared to man them for either tests or emergencies.

(19) Clean up within gun shield 1/2 hour before being relieved. Do not relieve a gun captain who turns over a dirty gun shield deck. He should sweep down before being relieved.

(20) Men may not sleep on gun stand or on deck in path of gun as it is trained around. Keep clear of moving parts.

(21) No smoking on Forward or After Battery.

(22) Have sight setter test phone as soon as he takes over to insure working order. Sight setters must tell Group Control Officers when they are changing phones as important information may be lost if this is not done.

(23) Inform Battery Officer, Control officer, or Gunner's Mate of anything that appears to be wrong with the gun, or any discrepancies that are noted.

(24) See that muzzle bag is on correctly. Inspect bore, making sure that it is clear. Also inspect tray and see that no dirt, papers, or gum are present.

(25) Routine Check Off List:
1. Test rammers
2. Air pressure (120-140 lbs)
3. Sight - Set up - 60 Min. 500 Def
4. Safety link removed from slide
5. Gun is at battery - check red marks
6. Check fuze setting ( 3V2 seconds)
7. Gloves for Hot Shellman and First Loader are at gun
8. Air supply is cut into the gun and pressure is normal (1700-1800)
9. Pointer's key is open and switch on motor generator
10. Gun at proper elevation and train (air ready position), (surface ready position). (Two guns into sun at all times.)
11. COVERS are in check sight telescopes when not in actual use.

2. Battery Officers and Battery Captains will insure that the provisions of this list are complied with.

Respectfully,
/s/ James T. Brewer, Lieutenant, USNR ball-red-02 Deceased
Air Defense Officer

Copy To:
Gunnery Officer
Gunner
Supervisor of Watch Notebook
O.O.D. Gunnery Notebook

US FLAGBAR

January 29, 1942

MEMORANDUM FOR ALL HANDS

Subject: Gas Masks, stowage and use of


1. STORAGE
(a) Remove metal face plate from mask and place plate nose down in bottom of sack.
(b) Remove adhesive tape over intake vents.
(c) Clip canister to rear of headpiece.
(d) Place mask inside of sack, resting it face down in metal face plate.
2. HOW TO USE A MASK
(a) When gas is actually present, use the following procedure for putting on your mask:

1. HOLD your Breath
2. Put mask on
3. TIGHTEN up on face STRAPS
4. HOLD FLUTTER VALVE and EXHALE thus forcing impure air out of mask
5. Double up rubber hoses thus cutting off air supply. If your mask fits correctly no air will come in through the sides of the mask. If air does come in, adjust straps until mask is airtight.
3. CAUTION
(a) A gas mask is protection for you lungs against gas. It merely removes impurities from the air, therefore it should not be used to combat smoke. A fire removes the oxygen from the air---gas masks do not supply oxygen, they merely filter the air.

(b) Rescue Breathing Apparatuses are located at Repair Stations to be used by instructed personnel for entering smoke filled compartments.
/s/ R. L. Blum, Jr., Ensign, USNR ball-red-02 Deceased
Gas Defense Officer

US FLAGBAR

March 6, 1942

GUNNERY DEPARTMENT MEMORANDUM NO. 3-42

Subject: AA Condition Watches

1. When the word is passed, "Set Special Condition Two in the Anti-aircraft Battery", turrets shall provide reserve AA crews to man those guns in the AA Battery which at present are not manned during Condition Two due to insufficient personnel. These crews shall be provided in accordance with the following table:


Section from which crew is provided 1 2 3 4
Forward 5" Battery
(Two crews required)
Turret I I I II
Turret II II III III
After 5"Battery
(One Crew required)
Turret III IV IV IV

2. "Special Condition Two in the Antiaircraft Battery" will be used only when no condition is set in the main Battery.

3. Also, turrets may be called upon to relieve certain regular AA crews during "Modified Condition Two" in order to equalize watch standing.

/s/ David M. Tyree, Lt. Commander, USN
Gunnery Officer

Copy to:
Captain
Executive Officer
All Officers
Post - Gunnery B.B.

US FLAGBAR

March 13, 1942

C O N F I D E N T I A L

MEMORANDUM FOR: SKY CONTROL, GROUP CONTR0L AND BATTERY OFFICERS

Subject: Tracking and Rangefinder Aerograph Calibration Runs for Antiaircraft Batteries.

1. The officer having the 0800-1200 sky control watch on weekdays will make every effort to participate in the tracking and calibration runs described below by:

(a) Organizing lookouts in the search.

(b) Employing the director crew on watch in these exercises.

(c) Working with 5th or 6th Division Officer to have him man the other director with his #one crew if at all possible for him to do so.

(d) Arranging with the Communication Watch Officer in plenty of time to man the circuit. (Use talk back with Radio I while drill is in progress).

(e) Employing battery in the drill as conditions permit.

(f) Arranging with O.O.D to pick up calibration data on days when calibration runs are made.

(g) Notifying (verbally or with rough memo) the Air Defense Officer daily whether or not you participated in drill - and to what extent.

1. Tracking and calibration runs for antiaircraft battery training will be conducted over Pearl Harbor from 1000 to 1100 as follows:

Monday - Tracking

Tuesday - Rangefinder Aerograph Calibration

Thursday- Tracking

Friday - Rangefinder Aerograph Calibration

Saturday - Tracking

2. Conduct and Procedure for Tracking Runs

(a) The tracking plane will be provided by the Utility Wing.

(b) The plane will be controlled by the Utility Wing Command on Ford Island and will follow usages prescribed by Commander Patrol Wing Two.

c) The Control frequency will be assigned by Commander Utility Wing. Key will be used. All transmissions except the announcements relative to starting and completing the runs will be in the Towing Code (CSP 1237.)

(d) The pilot of the tracking plane will follow the procedure prescribed below:

(1) The altitude of the run should normally be 7,000 to 14,000 feet dependent upon the ceiling of the day.
(2) The direction of runs should be varied in order to allow all ships present to drill.
(3) The pilot will make the following announcements: "Starting run No....." and give general geographical location;

(b) On reaching bomb release point, "Run Completed", (make a sharp turn away to indicate release point);
(c) Follow
(b) with "Altitude..., Speed..., Course...,Run No...."

3. Conduct and procedure for Rangefinder Aerograph Calibration

(a) The calibration plane and aerograph will be provided from the Utility Wing

(b) The plane will be controlled by the Utility Wing Commander and will follow usages prescribed by Commander Patrol Wing Two.

(c) The control frequency will be assigned by Commander Utility. Key will be used. Announcements will be used. Announcements will be in plain language.

(d) The pilot of the calibration plane will follow the procedure described below;

(1) The altitude of the run should be between 6,000 and 10,000 feet depending on the ceiling of the day. If the ceiling is below 6,000 the runs will be cancelled.

(2) The pilot of the calibration plane will make the following announcements:

(a) "Run No...." giving general geographical position.

(b) Make time signal before each run starting the run after time signal is completed.

(c) Announce "Run No...completed".

(d) Data will be furnished for each minute of the run.

(e) Upon the completion of the exercise, calibration data shall be made available for ships present in the Flag Office of the U.S.S. ARGONNE and the office of Commander Utility Wing on Ford Island by 1300 on the day of the exercise.

4. Tracking and calibration runs may be cancelled without notice, but, if practicable, advance notice of cancellation should be given."

Respectfully,
James T. Brewer, Lieutenant, USNR ball-red-02 Deceased
Assistant Gunnery Officer

Copy to:
Executive Officer
Gunnery Officer
Comm. Officer


US FLAGBAR

March 18, 1942

GUNNERY DEPARTMENT ORDER NO.2-42

Subject: Reports of Material Casualty or Personnel Error.


1. The following is quoted from Gunnery Sheet 21:

"Submit one report for each occurrence injuring or endangering personnel or material, or impairing rate or effectiveness of fire ..... Report on pertinent occurrences during training as well as during record firing."

2. Immediately after a drill, target practice, or action in which there is an occurrence such as described above, each officer concerned submit a report on Sheet 21 to the Gunnery Officer via the Air Defense Officer or Main Battery Assistant as applicable.

3. In making such reports, refer to material by drawing and piece number. Give sufficient detail to adequately describe the casualty.

/s/ David M. Tyree, Lt. Commander, USN
Gunnery Officer


US FLAGBAR

April 24, 1942

MEMORANDUM FOR: ALL DIVISION OFFICERS, SKY CONTROL OFFICERS, GROUP CONTROL OFFICERS, BATTERY OFFICERS.

Subject: Necessary Services - Excused from Condition II and III Watches.

1. In order that special calls for men to be excused from Condition Watches be eliminated and to stabilize the Condition Watch Crews the following definite assignments to definite necessary services in ship keeping have been assigned, These jobs are all to be excused from Condition II and III.

2. It is to be noted, with the following assignments in effect, that MESS COOKS ARE REQUIRED TO STAND CONDITION WATCHES WITH THEIR SECTIONS AND ARE REQUIRED TO ATTEND GUNNERY DRILLS.

ASSIGNMENTS (Placed in effect 4/24/42.)



JOB NAME RATE DIVISION SECTION
Master At Arms MCCALL, C. E. ball-red-02 Deceased CMM ENG. 1
SULEWSKI, F. ball-red-02 GM1c 1st 4
KREYER, R. H. ball-red-02 Deceased Cox R 1
MONROE, L. L. Cox 5th 3
MAXWELL, F. J. Cox 2nd 4
LAUNDRY WYCKOFF, G. M. Sea1c 3rd 3
TOTI, P. Sea1c F 2
STEWART, L. E. Sea1c 6th 3
HOLMES, R. O. ball-red-02 Deceased Sea1c 3rd 1
TENNYSON, J. Deceased F2c ENG 3
COX, C. N. Pvt. 7th 4
MURRAY, H. A. Sea1c 2nd 2
SCULLERY EIGHT MEN DETAILED FROM ENGINEERS
VEGETABLE PEELERS VANDERLEEST, G. Sea2c 1st 1
MELVILLE, A. G. ball-red-02 Deceased Sea2c 2nd 2
FITZGERALD, P. J. Sea2c 3rd 3
ZUCATI, R. L. Deceased Sea2c 5th 4
GALLEY, BAKE
BUTCHER, ISSUING ROOM
TWENTY MEN DETAILED FROM "S" DIVISION
CAPTAIN'S WARDROOM
WARRANT OFF' MESS
EIGHTEEN MEN DETAILED FROM 'S' DIVISION
CPO MESS COOKS JACOBSEN, J. R. Sea2c 2nd 1
GIBBS, T. D. Sea2c 4th 1
CLARK, R. W. Sea2c 6th 1
MESS HALL SUPERVISOR BEAN, W. H. ball-red-02 Deceased BM2c 5th 1
MAIN DECK HEAD ERNST, W. Deceased Sea2c 5th 3
MESS HALL VALERIO, E. ball-red-02 Sea2c 1st 3
MCCORNACK, A. A. Sea2c 2nd 3
DUNHAM, L. D. Sea2c 4th 2
FAWCETT, H. Sea1c 3rd 4
CATON, E. H. Deceased Sea2c 5th 2
EVANS, F. E. ball-red-02 Sea2c 6th 2
SHIPS SERVICE STORE SIMON, G. L. PFC 7th 4
CAPTAIN'S ORDERLIES FOUR MEN (2 MEN IN CONDITION II) FROM 7th DIV.
CAPTAIN'S & EXEC. OFFICER'S YEOMAN TWO MEN FROM CY DIV.
CHIEF STOREKEEPER ONE MAN FROM "S" DIV.
CHIEF QUARTERMASTER ONE MAN FROM "N" DIV.


RESPECTFULLY,
/s/ James T. Brewer, Lieutenant, USNR ball-red-02 Deceased
ASSISTANT GUNNERY OFFICER

COPY TO:
EXECUTIVE OFFICER
NAVIGATOR
GUNNERY OFFICER
SUPPLY OFFICER
COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER
GUNNER
CHIEF ENGINEER
CHIEF M.A.A.

FLAGBAR 501x15

May 13,1942

From: Chemical Warfare Officer
To: All Officers

Subject: Chemical Warfare.

Enclosure: (A) Gas Defense Officer’s Memorandum of May 13, 1942 - Gas Masks, stowage and use of. Gas Defense Officer’s Memorandum of May 13, 1942 - Decontamination Procedure for All Hands. Decontamination Instructions for Decontamination Parties.

1. The probability of a gas attack while underway is very remote and even if successfully delivered the casualties, if any, would be slight. However, in order to take all possible precautions and to be fully prepared for any eventuality preparations have been made as outlined in enclosures (A), (B), and (C).

All officers are requested to bring enclosures (A) and (B) to the attention of their divisions.

Enclosure (C) is intended for the guidance of decontamination parties, but it is suggested that all officers familiarize themselves with the procedure outlined in order that they can take charge of decontaminations operations if necessary.

2. GAS ALARM PROCEDURE.

The gas alarm will be sounded whenever gas is present in any part of the ship. The sounding of the gas alarm should not be taken as the signal for all hands to put on their gas masks - - gas masks should be put on by men in a given area only when gas is detected in that area.

The order to put on gas masks shall be given by the officer or petty officer in charge in a given area.

3. Officers should caution all men as follows:

(a) Not to put on gas masks until they are ordered to do so.
(b) Not to leave their Battle Stations to go to the Decontamination Stations until so ordered.

4. Gas mask drill will be held at 1300, May 14, 1942.

(a) Division Officers will make certain that "each gas mask is properly adjusted to fit the individual to whom it is issued" and that he knows how to put it on.

(b) Division officers will be supplied with copies of Enclosures
(A) and (B) for the information of and distribution to their men.

(c) Attention is invited to the fact that the purpose of gas mask is twofold.

(1) To familiarize men with the technique of putting on a gas mask
(2) To give them practice so they can put one on quickly.

R. L. Blum, Jr., Ensign, USNR ball-red-02 Deceased

Approved:

Edward E. Dolecek, Commander, USN, Executive Officer
Damage Control Officer


FLAGBAR 501x15

May 13, 1942

MEMORANDUM FOR ALL HANDS.

Subject: Gas Masks, storage and use of.

1. Stowage:
(a) Remove metal face plate from mask and place plate nose down in bottom of sack.

(b) REMOVE ADHESIVE TAPE OVER INTAKE VENTS.

(c) Clip canister to rear of headpiece.

(d) Place mask inside of sack, resting it face down in the metal face plate.

(e) Strap gas mask to under side of bunk, near foot.

2. HOW TO USE A GAS MASK

(a) When gas is actually present, use the following procedure for putting on your mask.

1. HOLD YOUR BREATH
2. Put mask on
3. TIGHTEN UP ON FACE STRAPS
4. HOLD FLUTTER VALVE and EXHALE thus forcing impure air out of mask.
5. Double up rubber hoses thus cutting off air supply. If your mask fits correctly no air will come in through the sides of the mask. If air does come in, adjust straps until mask is airtight.

3. CAUTION:

(a)A gas mask is protection for your lungs against gas. It merely removes impurities from the air, therefore it should not be used to combat smoke. A fire removes the oxygen from the air--gas masks do not supply oxygen, merely filter the air.

Subject: Gas Masks, stowage and use of.

(b) Rescue Breathing Apparatuses are located at Repair Stations to be used by properly instructed personnel for entering smoke filled compartments.

/s/R. L. Blum, Jr., Ensign, USNR ball-red-02 Deceased
Gas Defense Officer
Copy to: All Officers
All Bulletin Boards
All Hands


FLAGBAR 501x15

May 13, 1942

MEMORANDUM TO ALL HANDS

Subject:Decontamination, procedure for.


1. RECOGNITION OF GASES.
GAS ODOR
Mustard Gas Like garlic
Lewisite Like geraniums CN (tear gas) Like sour fruit

2. WHAT TO DO WHEN EXPOSED TO GAS.

(a) Put on gas mask When Ordered
(b) Report to Decontamination Station (Crew's Washroom) when ordered.

3. CAUTION.- Although exposed to gas do not leave your Battle Station because:

(a) Tear Gas effects only your eyes; therefore, a gas mask alone will prevent injurious effects.
(b) Mustard Gas will effect the skin, but does not become effective until FOUR (4) hours after contact.
c) Lewisite Gas will effect the skin, but does not become effective until ONE (1) hour after contact.

4. If you have been exposed to gas and when so ordered, report to the Decontamination Station (Crew's Washroom) where the following procedure will be followed.

(a) Remove all clothing and leave it outside the washroom, do not touch it once you have removed it (it will be burned). Enter the washroom from aft only, leave from the forward door only.
(b Wash down with kerosene.
c) Wash down thoroughly with soap and fresh water. This scrubbing down is the principle requirement for proper decontamination.
(d) Leave Decontamination Station by the forward door; proceed to your locker put on fresh clothes.

5. Should an enclosed space become contaminated with gas, all hands will stay clear of this space until it has been chemically decontaminated by properly equipped decontamination parties.

6. Due to the fact that any gas must settle down on an area before becoming effective the danger of injury from chemical agents while underway is very slight.

APPROVED

Edward E. Dolecek, Commander, USN, Executive Officer
/s/ R. L. Blum, Jr., Ensign, USNR ball-red-02 Deceased
Gas Defense Officer
Commander, USN
First Lieutenant.


FLAGBAR 501x15

May 13, 1942

DECONTAMINATION INSTRUCTIONS FOR DECONTAMINATION PARTIES.

I. Decontamination is the term applied to the process of removing or destroying chemical agents from either, personnel or material. It may be used in connection with either a persistent vesicant (causing tissue burns) agent, such as - mustard or lewisite or with a semi-vesicant harassing agent such as- tear gas(CN). Generally however, "decontamination" refers only to mustard or lewisite.

II. PERSONNEL DECONTAMINATION will be accomplished as outlined in the Gas Defense Officer's Memorandum to All Hands of May 13, 1942 - Procedure for Decontamination. Men engaged in this work will wear full decontamination outfits in handling contaminated clothing.

III. MATERIAL DECONTAMINATION will be accomplished by special Decontamination Parties (taken from the Repair Parties) in line with the following procedure:

1. The following necessary equipment will be stowed at each of the four (4) Repair Stations.

12 suits of impregnated clothing.
24 pairs of impregnated socks.
12 pairs of impregnated gloves.
12 pairs of rubber overshoes.
1 spray pump.
10 gallons of ready-mixed decontaminating solution in 5 gallon cans. Gas masks.

2. DECONTAMINATION PARTIES will wear the following equipment when engaged in this work:

(a) Impregnated suit of protective clothing.
(b) Impregnated pair of protective gloves.
c) Impregnated pair of protective socks.
(d) Gas masks.
(e) Rubber overshoes.

3. In all decontamination, work from the top of a vertical area down and from windward to leeward.

4. CN or Tear Gas can be eliminated from an area by simply airing it out as follows:
(a) Turn on full force the exhaust blowers in the area.
(b) Open doors to connecting spaces and turn on supply blowers in them thus creating a forced draft through contaminated area.
c) One (1) hours airing will usually clear an area.
(d) After airing wash down area thoroughly with soap and water.

DECONTAMINATION PROCEDURES FOR DECONTAMINATION PARTIES.

5. MUSTARD GAS OR LEWISITE must be treated with a chemical decontamination solution which is mixed according to the following formula:

(a) 1 lb. Of RH-195 (supply in locker over crew's head), 10 lbs. Of solvent (supply in chemical locker in Port Passageway on main deck at frame 831.
(b) Mix in an open vessel, preferably topside, stir with a wooden paddle until powder dissolved.
c) Do not confuse RH-195 with CC No.2 - both are powders- the former (RH- 195) is used for decontamination, the latter (CC No.2) for impregnation.

6. One (1) gallon of the above solution will decontaminate 15 sq. yds. (30 sq. yds. of a moderately contaminated area). NOTE: Each spray pump contains 3 gallons- fill pumps to level on internal clip ("full" level). Do not fill until just before using.

7. Scrub area thoroughly with a broom or ki-yis, for at least 5 minutes (in case of wooden decks leave solution in contact for at least 30 minutes - linoleum also re- quires longer treatment due to its porous nature).

8. Do not wet down before applying solution.

9. After scrubbing down as above wash down thoroughly with soap and water.

10. Do not allow anyone to enter contaminated area until it has been inspected by a C&R officer.

11. Decontamination does not take well to canvas therefore burn contaminated canvas. Hemp or manila line is weakened by mustard gas therefore destroy affected line (usually only outer coils on a reel).

12. Burn contaminated bedding.

13. No de-mustardization is necessary in hot machinery spaces as the temperature and the humidity will break down the mustard vapor and render it harmless

APPROVED:
R. L. Blum, Jr., Ensign, USNR ball-red-02 Deceased
Edward E. Dolecek, Commander, USN, Executive Officer
Gas Defense Officer
Commander, USN
First Lieutenant.


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